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Model Boat Builder Gallery - Last additions

Model Boat Builder Gallery

Display, Working and Pre-Owned Models.


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trawler1.jpg
Trawler (miniature)490 viewsWe built this pretty little display model of a deepwater trawler from scratch, for a member of the family which had owned her. She was sent to Hawaii as a present for a relative.
The client had to set a tight limit on budget, so we weren't able to go to town on the detail as we might have liked to. She is a pleasant little model, and if nothing else, she illustrates the variety of commissions which we are willing and able to undertake.
(model by Frank Hasted)
31 Dec 2007
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Sovereign of the Seas.432 viewsShe makes a magnificent and spectacular model. The client for this example chose to have her built without her rig. Many museums have models which are displayed in this fashion. It sets off the magnificence of the hull without distractions, and considerably reduces storage space and the risk of damage.
(Model by Frank Hasted)
31 Dec 2007
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Sovereign of the Seas.406 viewsShe cost £65,187, at a time when a workman might earn £5 per year. Today's protestors against Trident might reflect cynically that extravagant expenditure on the ultimate weapon of its day is obviously nothing new. However, in those days the British populace was less docile. The Ship Money tax which Charles the First raised to pay for her was a major contributory factor to the Civil War, in which his Government was overthrown, and he was executed31 Dec 2007
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Sovereign of the Seas.407 viewsThe "Sovereign of the Seas was launched in 1637. For her day she was an astonishingly advanced vessel. She was the first three-deck hundred gun line of battle ship, setting a pattern which was to be recogniseably followed for most of the next two hundred years, until fighting sail was superceded by steam. She was a sharp departure from the galleons and their developments which had preceded her. Her rig was similarly advanced for its day. She was the first Royal Naval vessel to cross royal yards. Her decoration was more ornate than any vessel before or since, causing the Dutch, against whom she fought, to call her the "Golden Devil"31 Dec 2007
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Shamrock V (J Class)384 views"Shamrock V" survives. At the time of writing (2001), she has just completed a magnificent restoration at Pendennis Shipyard in Falmouth. She has been restored to a condition very close to the original. The closest attention has been paid to everything, down to the details and materials of her cabin furnishings. However, despite appearances, in many ways she is now a very different boat. A conspicuous radar aerial decorates her modern mast, she has twin engines, and a full set of modern winches to control her rig. There is only one conundrum. Whereas in the 1930s, she seemed to manage with about 19 professional racing crew, and few winches, today, with the benefit of a full outfit of modern winches and other labour saving equipment, she seems to need about 30 hands.
It would be churlish to nitpick. Anyone who has seen that lovely dark green hull, endlessly graceful, slicing through the water, can only stand and wonder. Our model is a tiny tribute to a very lovely yacht. We hope you may feel it will grace your home or office.
31 Dec 2007
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Shamrock V (J Class)413 viewsShe set off for the Americas Cup after an extremely successful season in British waters. At the time, she had a wooden mast, laminated from about fifty pieces of silver spruce. Many of her lines were rope, where their equivalents in "Enterpise" were wire. She relied heavily on tackles, having few winches. It also seems that her afterguard were less expert than Vanderbilt's team, while at the same time being reluctant to take advice from the professional crew. It is therefore perhaps not surprising that she was badly defeated, never looking likely to win a single race of the series.
31 Dec 2007
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Shamrock V (J Class)443 viewsDesigned by Charles Nicholson, she was planked in mahogany over galvanised steel frames. This was an unusual form of construction for a J. Apart from the American "Whirlwind", all had metal hulls. Her lines are very graceful. She is noticeably narrower than most J boats, a feature which our model faithfully reproduces. This makes her a little tender in strong winds, but very slippery indeed in light airs. On one occasion, she won a race by shooting straight for the line over a distance of three miles, her skipper relying on her ability to carry her way through the light fluky breeze and patches of calm.
31 Dec 2007
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Shamrock V (J Class)521 viewsMarking the end of one era and the beginning of a new one, "Shamrock V" was the last Americas Cup challenger built for Sir Thomas Lipton, who had tried, unsucessfully, to regain the cup, for many years. She was also the first British J class yacht.
31 Dec 2007
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Trent class lifeboat (miniature)547 views31 Dec 2007
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Trent class lifeboat (miniature)526 viewsNot quite as detailed as some of the larger and more detailed lifeboat models, but not nearly so expensive, either, nor is she so demanding of display space.31 Dec 2007
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Arun 52-23 half model.492 viewsWe created this half model for one of her coxswains, on his retirement.31 Dec 2007
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Ranger. (J Class)443 viewsShe was broken up in 1941. It seems a full-sized replica may be built. You can buy our lovely miniature replica for a great deal less, today.
31 Dec 2007
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