Notice: Undefined offset: 8192 in /home/model/public_html/gallery/include/debugger.inc.php on line 112

Notice: Undefined offset: 8192 in /home/model/public_html/gallery/include/debugger.inc.php on line 112
Model Boat Builder Gallery - Home

Model Boat Builder Gallery

Display, Working and Pre-Owned Models.


Home Login
Album list Last uploads Last comments Most viewed Top rated My Favourites Search

162 files in 3 albums with 0 comments viewed 58295 times
Display Models


Victory_starboard_bow_for_site.jpg

77 files, last one added on 20 Jul 2010

Working Models


Hurworth_5.jpg

79 files, last one added on 2 Sep 2011

Pre-Owned Models


Vosper_graphic.jpg

6 files, last one added on 1 Jan 2008

3 albums on 1 page(s)

Examples of models various types.
Narrowboat_for_site.jpg
Red narrowboat539 viewsWe built two narrowboats, for a gentleman whose garden is given over to a large and splendid live-steam narrow-gauge system.
Visitors on open days say they make a marvellous sight, gliding silently along the cut, while the little trains chuff along the quays, and passing the two without mishap is as interesting as in a real canal.

Check: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rgTcQzjB1K8

Endeavour2.jpg
Endeavour (J Class)182 viewsSo why didn't she win? As the proverb has it, "It's not the ships, it's the men in them". Vanderbilt's organisation and tactics were excellent, both before the Cup series and during it. Sopwith's were less so.
Thirteen of Sopwith's professional crew left his employ eight days before "Endeavour" was due to sail for America. In those days, professional yacht hands worked as fishermen over the winter. The Cup series was held in September 1934, so they would be back from America too late to get berths in the fishery. Sopwith refused to increase his pay offer to make up the difference. It seemed likely that their families would suffer real hardship. Despite a good deal of hysteria in the yachting press, all the "mutineers" soon found berths on other yachts, which would never have happenned if they had not had reason on their side. Sopwith engaged a crew of amateur sailors, most of whom had no experience of something as big as a J boat. The amateurs proved extremely efficient. All the same, losing most of the practiced professionals must have had some effect on "Endeavour"s performance.
coureur5.jpg
Coureur (bow detail)207 views
Ranger3.jpg
Ranger. (J Class)225 viewsThis was fully exploited by a brilliant design team, which included the experience of Starling Burgess and the rising talent of the young Olin Stephens. The set of lines you see here resulted. Some considered them unconventional, even ugly. To my eye, they are extremely beautiful, and speak of speed.
Complete_Port_Bow_View.jpg
Small Colin Archer, Port Bow view.267 viewsBuilt to a tight deadline for a wedding present, she makes a pretty picture.
(Model by John Davies)
lexington1.jpg
Lexington163 viewsWe created this lovely model of the American privateer "Lexington", a vessel famous from the War of Independence, for a private collector.
While the model faithfully follows the best available historic material on the vessel, it is in fact modified from a well-known plank-on-frame kit. This enabled us to complete the model within a shorter construction time, and thus keep the cost down.
This sort of ingenious solution is typical of the bespoke service we offer clients. She is also a quite exquisite model.
(model by Gordon Williams)
peggy2.jpg
Peggy554 viewsThey were built to pursue "the silver harvest, free to all", the herring which once swarmed in the North sea in huge, seemingly inexhaustible shoals. Now, due to a combination of overfishing and pollution, herring stocks have collapsed to the point where no more can be landed from the North Sea. We are learning, slowly and late, that the natural world is not an inexhaustible storehouse of resources to be plundered at will.
peggy1.jpg
Peggy542 viewsThis fine model of a North Sea Herring Drifter represents a vanished era. They were built in their thousands, but now only one remains in preservation. They evoke not only a vanished industry, but a major change in our attitudes to the natural world.