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Model Boat Builder Gallery - Home

Model Boat Builder Gallery

Display, Working and Pre-Owned Models.


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162 files in 3 albums with 0 comments viewed 129779 times
Display Models


Victory_starboard_bow_for_site.jpg

77 files, last one added on 20 Jul 2010

Working Models


Hurworth_5.jpg

79 files, last one added on 2 Sep 2011

Pre-Owned Models


Vosper_graphic.jpg

6 files, last one added on 1 Jan 2008

3 albums on 1 page(s)

Examples of models various types.
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"Robert Hastie"538 viewsDesigned by Camarc, a world specialist in this type of vessel (they have also designed boats for the New York pilot service), the "Robert Hastie" is a fine vessel of the most modern type. The model captures her powerful lines and distinctive appearance in every detail.
(models by John Davies and Frank Hasted)
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Rainbow (J Class)611 views
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ASR 1021022 viewsAir Sea Rescue Launch 102 is preserved in full running order by Power Boat Restorations, at Hythe, on the Solent. She makes a lovely prototype for a scale launch.
The model is not too big, elaborate or expensive, but she carries a satisfying level of detail, and has a lively performance. She is a good model to take to the water on impulse, and blast around until the batteries run out.
These boats are of great historic interest. They were the first high-speed planing vessels designed to operate in the open sea. Previously, planing boats had been confined to inshore racing courses, and "fast" offshore rescue craft had been exemplified by the RNLI's "Sir William Hillary", a displacement type boat with a top speed of seventeen knots. In contrast, these ASRs would make forty knots. Every fast motor yacht, and all of the modern breed of lifeboat, owe a design debt to these launches.
This model was featured in "Marine Modelling" magazine, April 1999, and is now in the famous Childe Beale collection.
(model by John Davies)
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Peggy984 viewsThis model is over four feet long, and weighs over twenty pounds. She is thus fairly demanding of display space. Every expedition to the water demands careful planning, to get her in and out of the car without damage, and to transport her safely from the car-park to the water. But what a magnificent picture she makes! Models of this kind carry a level of detail, and acheieve a presence on the water, which their smaller sisters simply cannot match. She has a full range of working features, including navigation lights which work in two modes; steaming, or lying to her nets.
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Small Colin Archer, Port Bow view.714 viewsBuilt to a tight deadline for a wedding present, she makes a pretty picture.
(Model by John Davies)
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Coureur (stern detail)614 viewsWhile the Royal Navy was supreme in fleet actions in the Napoleonic War, they were still caused considerable grief by the French chasse-maree luggers. Fast, agile and heavily crewed, they would dash out from Biscayan ports to snap up any unwary British merchantmen which wandered within reach. "Le Coureur" is a fine example of the type. This beautiful model illustrates the exquisite craftsmanship which goes into all our scale replicas.
(model by Gordon Williams)
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HMS Endeavour561 viewsCaptain James Cook is best known for his discovery of Australia. He has other solid claims to fame. He was a superb seaman. He was almost certainly the best navigator of his era. He was one of the very few men of this period to be commissioned from the lower deck.
His greatest achievement was to virtually eliminate the terrible scourge of scurvy. This disease is a vitamin deficiency, caused by limited understanding of diet. Before Captain Cook, it was accepted that on every long voyage, a large proportion of the crew would die. Cook was not prepared to accept this. He made a scientific study of diet, and used his crew as guinea pigs to test his theories, experimenting with a variety of different diets. He nearly caused a mutiny at one point, by ordering that every man should eat two pounds of raw onions each day for a week, but in a voyage of almost three years, he did not lose a single man to scurvy.
He was also responsible for enormous advances in the science of navigation. While a ship's distance north or south from the equator can be calculated using a simple noon sight, to calculate an accurate position east or west demands a precise knowledge of the time. There is an alternative method involving sights of the moon, but it is complex, and only the finest navigators would be able to use it. Cook took to sea and tested the first really accurate chronometers. It is a sobering reflection to realise that before this important advance in technology, few captains could have been exactly certain of where they were once they sailed out of sight of land.
It was these huge advances in diet and navigation which made long-distance ocean voyages far less reliant on chance. They thus paved the way for the huge expansion in European colonialism in the nineteenth century. This quiet, intelligent son of a Yorkshire farm worker probably did more to change the history of the world than all the fighting admirals put together. To a very great extent, we all of us live in the world he made possible.
This model of Captain Cook's "Endeavour" is thus not only a beautiful display piece in her own right, but she is of the greatest historical interest. She will make a fitting embellishment to any home, to a museum, or to the offices of any shipping company, all of which still owe a debt to Captain Cook's pioneering discoveries.
(model by Frank Hasted)
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Clyde Puffer1390 viewsThe Clyde Puffers have been immortalised; some might say sentimentalised, in the Para Handy Tales. In reality, the pufferman's life was a hard one, sailing all the year round, in all weathers, around the west coast of Scotland.